Maybe I’m dreaming you. Maybe you’re dreaming me; maybe we only exist in each other’s dreams and every morning when we wake up we forget all about each other.
Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler’s Wife (via seabois)

(via seabois)

posted 2 hours ago

Thirty-two hours of higher quality work is better than 40 hours of lower quality work

posted 2 hours ago

posted 20 hours ago

powells:

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist, died today. He was 87. http://powells.us/1qQFL4r

powells:

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist, died today. He was 87. http://powells.us/1qQFL4r

posted 23 hours ago

fairtradeusa:

Are you passionate about Fair Trade? Do you want to spend your days at work making a positive impact on the lives of farmers & workers around the world?Join our team! Check out the various positions we’re hiring for here: http://fairtrd.us/1labO00

fairtradeusa:

Are you passionate about Fair Trade? Do you want to spend your days at work making a positive impact on the lives of farmers & workers around the world?

Join our team! Check out the various positions we’re hiring for here: http://fairtrd.us/1labO00

posted 23 hours ago

Surrealism comes from the reality of Latin America.

posted 1 day ago

oldbookillustrations:

Pandora opened the lid.

Helen Stratton, from A book of myths, by Jeanie Lang, New York, 1915.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Pandora opened the lid.

Helen Stratton, from A book of myths, by Jeanie Lang, New York, 1915.

(Source: archive.org)

posted 1 day ago

politicalprof:

letterstomycountry:

portiaofourchambers:

via.
This is a pretty helpful infographic, but like most “know your rights” information out there, it raises more questions than it answers.  
Generally speaking, I tell clients, friends and family that in a police encounter the best thing to do is be respectful and truthful. If you don’t feel like you can tell the truth without getting into trouble or arousing further suspicion, ask if you are free to leave, and if you are told you are not free to leave, inform the officer that you will not be answering any more questions until you have spoken with an attorney.  Then just stand your ground, continue to be respectful and polite but don’t say anything more.
"I’m sorry, officer, I don’t consent to searches," is a great phrase to have in your back pocket.  And you guys — don’t consent to searches.  Even if you believe you have nothing to hide.

LTMC: I like to tell people that it’s not their job to help the Government prove them guilty of anything.  Never consent to searches.  Always say “no” when they ask you if you know why they pulled you over, even if you think you do (you’re not in the officer’s head, and they may have pulled you over for a different reason.  Don’t accidentally implicate yourself to another crime!).  
Never give them more information than they ask for.  Keep your answers as brief as possible.  Even if you think you have nothing to hide, you’d be surprised how often people are breaking the law without even realizing it.  Giving elaborate answers may inadvertently provide police probable cause to search you or your vehicle.
They can ask you for your driver’s license and registration, and in New York, they can ask you to take a breathalyzer (you technically can refuse, but if you do, it’s an automatic license revocation).  Police can also order you to step out of your vehicle.  Even if they start to search you or your car illegally, let them do it.  Don’t be a martyr.  You’ll just get yourself into more trouble.  It’s not fair, but it’s reality.  Remember, they have a gun.  And they’re far more concerned about their own safety than yours.  Challenge it in court, not on the sidewalk.
With that being said, I’m in the process of writing an article premised on the idea that no attorney should advise a client to voluntarily speak to the police under any circumstances—even if they witness or are a victim of criminal activity—because anecdotal evidence suggests it will always be against their penal interest to do so, absent structural reforms in the law.
People do dumb and/or weird things when they’re in stressful situations.  They say things they don’t mean.  They utter sentences that come out wrong.  They misspeak.  They remember things wrong.  They give vague answers that can be interpreted in multiple ways.  This creates a high risk of accidentally implicating yourself in a crime is high when speaking to the police.  It’s even higher when you’re being detained.  
Other times, people simply react as one would expect, and they end up paying for it. Like Kenny Dixon, who discovered his stepson’s dead body in his garage after the latter committed suicide.  A police officer at the scene grabbed Dixon’s arm and tried to push him away from his stepson’s body.  Dixon, who was understandably inconsolable, asked the officer not to touch him.  Dixon was tackled, punched, and beaten by several officers at the scene, then arrested and charged a felony.  Thank goodness the police were there to help the victim’s family cope with their grief!
So yes, don’t talk to the police unless you have to.  If you’re being detained, don’t consent to searches, always answer “no” when asked if you know why you’re being detained, and don’t give them more information than they ask for.  Even fi you think you’re helping your case, it’s far more likely that you aren’t.

Politicalprof: this is all good advice.

politicalprof:

letterstomycountry:

portiaofourchambers:

via.

This is a pretty helpful infographic, but like most “know your rights” information out there, it raises more questions than it answers.  

Generally speaking, I tell clients, friends and family that in a police encounter the best thing to do is be respectful and truthful. If you don’t feel like you can tell the truth without getting into trouble or arousing further suspicion, ask if you are free to leave, and if you are told you are not free to leave, inform the officer that you will not be answering any more questions until you have spoken with an attorney.  Then just stand your ground, continue to be respectful and polite but don’t say anything more.

"I’m sorry, officer, I don’t consent to searches," is a great phrase to have in your back pocket.  And you guys — don’t consent to searches.  Even if you believe you have nothing to hide.

LTMC: I like to tell people that it’s not their job to help the Government prove them guilty of anything.  Never consent to searches.  Always say “no” when they ask you if you know why they pulled you over, even if you think you do (you’re not in the officer’s head, and they may have pulled you over for a different reason.  Don’t accidentally implicate yourself to another crime!).  

Never give them more information than they ask for.  Keep your answers as brief as possible.  Even if you think you have nothing to hide, you’d be surprised how often people are breaking the law without even realizing it.  Giving elaborate answers may inadvertently provide police probable cause to search you or your vehicle.

They can ask you for your driver’s license and registration, and in New York, they can ask you to take a breathalyzer (you technically can refuse, but if you do, it’s an automatic license revocation).  Police can also order you to step out of your vehicle.  Even if they start to search you or your car illegally, let them do it.  Don’t be a martyr.  You’ll just get yourself into more trouble.  It’s not fair, but it’s reality.  Remember, they have a gun.  And they’re far more concerned about their own safety than yours.  Challenge it in court, not on the sidewalk.

With that being said, I’m in the process of writing an article premised on the idea that no attorney should advise a client to voluntarily speak to the police under any circumstances—even if they witness or are a victim of criminal activity—because anecdotal evidence suggests it will always be against their penal interest to do so, absent structural reforms in the law.

People do dumb and/or weird things when they’re in stressful situations.  They say things they don’t mean.  They utter sentences that come out wrong.  They misspeak.  They remember things wrong.  They give vague answers that can be interpreted in multiple ways.  This creates a high risk of accidentally implicating yourself in a crime is high when speaking to the police.  It’s even higher when you’re being detained.  

Other times, people simply react as one would expect, and they end up paying for it. Like Kenny Dixon, who discovered his stepson’s dead body in his garage after the latter committed suicide.  A police officer at the scene grabbed Dixon’s arm and tried to push him away from his stepson’s body.  Dixon, who was understandably inconsolable, asked the officer not to touch him.  Dixon was tackled, punched, and beaten by several officers at the scene, then arrested and charged a felony.  Thank goodness the police were there to help the victim’s family cope with their grief!

So yes, don’t talk to the police unless you have to.  If you’re being detained, don’t consent to searches, always answer “no” when asked if you know why you’re being detained, and don’t give them more information than they ask for.  Even fi you think you’re helping your case, it’s far more likely that you aren’t.

Politicalprof: this is all good advice.

posted 1 day ago

threadless:

From the depths of the ocean, “I’d Like to be Under the Sea" by choubaka360 is one of this week’s new designs! We asked choubaka360 why this design was perfect for a tee, and we loved the answer we got:
“Put on this t-shirt, bring a book to a rocking chair under the sea, and it will become instantly obvious!”
Check out the rest of this week’s new tees!

threadless:

From the depths of the ocean, “I’d Like to be Under the Sea" by choubaka360 is one of this week’s new designs! We asked choubaka360 why this design was perfect for a tee, and we loved the answer we got:

“Put on this t-shirt, bring a book to a rocking chair under the sea, and it will become instantly obvious!”

Check out the rest of this week’s new tees!

posted 1 day ago

oldbookillustrations:

What was he doing, the great god Pan, down in the reeds by the river?

Helen Stratton, from A book of myths, by Jeanie Lang, New York, 1915.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

What was he doing, the great god Pan, down in the reeds by the river?

Helen Stratton, from A book of myths, by Jeanie Lang, New York, 1915.

(Source: archive.org)

posted 1 day ago

poetrybomb:

pre1923:

In a Library by Emily DickinsonPoems, 1890

Now that is a Library Love Letter! Note that in addition to it being National Poetry Month, it’s also National Library Week. Two great things to celebrate, and that poem does a more than fitting job of covering both.

poetrybomb:

pre1923:

In a Library by Emily Dickinson
Poems, 1890

Now that is a Library Love Letter! Note that in addition to it being National Poetry Month, it’s also National Library Week. Two great things to celebrate, and that poem does a more than fitting job of covering both.

(via powells)

posted 1 day ago

good:

Why is it so hard to quit smoking?

posted 2 days ago

hurrl-scout:

Gustav Klimt - Death and Life (1910/15)

hurrl-scout:

Gustav Klimt - Death and Life (1910/15)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via ivanfilios)

posted 2 days ago

visual-poetry:

»earth to earth ashes to ashes dust to dust« by lawrence weiner (+)

visual-poetry:

»earth to earth ashes to ashes dust to dust« by lawrence weiner (+)

posted 2 days ago

mypubliclands:

Last night’s blood moon as viewed along the American Wild and Scenic River in California, one of the few urban rivers in the U.S. to have a wild and scenic designation. The river flows from the Sierra crest to downtown Sacramento.  The BLM manages segments of the North and South forks of the river which are popular for whitewater boating and gold panning.  BLM photo.
Plan your visit: http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/folsom/nfamerican.html

mypubliclands:

Last night’s blood moon as viewed along the American Wild and Scenic River in California, one of the few urban rivers in the U.S. to have a wild and scenic designation. The river flows from the Sierra crest to downtown Sacramento.  The BLM manages segments of the North and South forks of the river which are popular for whitewater boating and gold panning.  BLM photo.

Plan your visit: http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/folsom/nfamerican.html

posted 2 days ago